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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
offshore. it will collide with an arctic front from the west, throwing a new dose of energy into the storm and expanding its already monster size and reach. then, inject the 1 150-mile-an-hour plus winds of the jet stream and forecasters think sandy explodes into a superstorm. so, that unbelievable cold air is what everyone's going to notice, as that cold wind whips around and grabs this tropical moisture. now, this storm, even though it's way different from any other storm we've ever seen move up the coastline does have all the ingredients of a really bad storm. let's start with the storm surge and where we're standing right now, we probably won't be able to stand tomorrow night at this time with maybe 11 feet of additional water up here. that's over my head at this point because we're just about two feet over the water right now. and then look how far that surge runs, anywhere from the virginia coastline all the way up to maine. that's the surge with the initial impulse of that storm on the coastline. but look at the wind. this is long-lasting, long duration wind. more than a day of this
. it will collide with an arctic front coming in from the west, throwing a new dose of energy into the storm and expanding its already monther size and reach. then, inject the 1 150-mile-per-hour plus winds of the jet stream and forecasters think sandy explodes into a superstorm. and so when you see something like that, then you realize this is not just a hurricane, this is a totally different animal. there is nothing we can compare it to, a storm system in the northeast, in the atlantic, it's very difficult to say this is going to be like any other storm, because it's really cutting brand new territory. there are the elements that are a problem here, no matter what kind of storm moves onshore. there's the storm surge and sandy looks like it's going have a big one. as you said, david, there's estimates that the storm surge here will be above 11 feet. we looked back, we can't see ever, 1960, there was one incident of ten feet of water in new york harbor and that was the most up until that point. we haven't seen anything that would approach the 11.5 estimate. you can see how the storm surge is
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)